All posts in Advice

How to Tell Your Client You Won’t Do Extensive Photoshop Work for Free

No Photoshop Work for Free

Your client comes to you with a Photoshop request — or maybe a long list of them. They go far beyond what you normally do in your retouching process when you send their products off to print. How do you tell them that you will have to charge an additional fee without sounding like a jerk?

(PS – We are going to assume that if your photo is blue like the one above, you’re going to work on getting better colors in camera before you even take the photo, and that you’ll fix that for free before you show your client the proofs. M’kay?)

Setting the Your Prices & Your Scope

First of all, back when you set your prices for your products, you should have taken in to consideration the time involved in creating your products as part of the price. (Haven’t done this? Get your hands on Jamie of The Modern Tog’s Pricing Guide Workbook or Joy Vertz’s videos & course on pricing!)

In that process, you have to define your scope of what retouching you will do. For example, my printing includes minor skin smoothing – blemishes, cellulite – and retouching of indentation caused by wardrobe. Sometimes I have a client do a pose that looks amazing, but it causes a minor wardrobe glitch so I’ll retouch those. For wedding photography, I would remove those annoying white strings that are on dresses to help hang them on hangers, and “arm cleavage” from strapless dresses.

I will not do complete body reshaping. Women are beautiful as they are to me, and I won’t make them something that they are not. However, maybe that is your thing? So you make sure your pricing includes time for an hour of editing per photograph. Whatever you want to do? Make sure you have defined what your normal is for your work.

Setting Client Expectations

I’ll admit that I cringe whenever I hear someone say, “Well, you can fix that in Photoshop!” It isn’t always a quick and easy fix, and I’ll be the first to confess that extensive retouching is not my thing. Not at all.

It still happens though, and I respect the fact that my clients want these photos to be amazing to them because they will be looking at them a lot longer than I will. However, I’ll have to pay my photo editor more for the work because it is outside of our agreed scope as well.

I don’t want to tell them no, but I am going to have to tell them that there will be an additional charge.

Set expectations in advance. I have conversations with my clients before their session about the level of editing that I do. It is represented by the photographs on my website. I cover it again at the end of their session, going over what’s next (we only cull & color correct before their In Person Sales Session). At the In Person Sales meeting, if there is a blemish or something else my client is concerned about, I reassure them that we will take care of it.

Ideally, the additional Photoshop requests will come up in person, but I’ve found that most of the time they don’t come up until they proof their album. While it is a rare situation for me, I have received emails before with 17 different requests of things to do, including complete body reshaping. You know, it happens. Most of my clients aren’t photographers. They don’t know what is easy, and what isn’t. I get the reason for their requests.

How to Handle the Additional Work & Fees

First and foremost, I consider their request. I’ll talk with my photo editor and get an idea from her how long it will take. If it is something she says she can do in 10 minutes? They just spent thousands of dollars with me, I’m not going to ask them to pay for an extra 10 minutes of work.

Sometimes, what they want will take hours. Or it has to be done on 30 images. Whatever the case may be, sometimes? I have to ask them to pay more. Here is the core of what I send to them in response – feel free to save a copy of this in case you ever need it in the future!

My retouching of photos includes (list out here – mine is skin smoothing, and minor liquifying if wardrobe causes skin indents). I am happy to do this additional work as per your request. Retouching like this is more extensive, and there is an additional charge of $75/hour for the editing. This will also delay the delivery of your product by (amount of time).

I estimate it will take (however many hours); this is just an estimate and it may take longer. Please let me know if you would like me to proceed with list of edits that you sent and that you agree to the additional cost.

I sandwich that with pleasantries about how it is great to hear from them. I over estimate on the time, just in case. After all, if I tell them 3 hours and it takes 2? Awesome! If I tell them 2 hours and it takes 5? They probably won’t be so happy about that.

Once you send the email off, wait to hear back from them. They might decide that the edits aren’t worth it to them, or they may change the list.

(If you hate composing emails in tough situations with clients, Jamie of The Moderntog can help you out with that as well with her her Go To Guide for Client Emails.)

I Suck at Photoshop and Can’t Do the Edits They Requested

Aww… I fell your pain! Photoshop? Not my thing. You have a few options here:

  • Learn more about how to retouch. Take a class, get out there & practice. Many learning options are available, including an awesome one from my friend Nino Batista! All the details are at the end of this post.
  • Outsource it. For me? This was the best option. I don’t want to learn more about how to do it because it cuts in to my personal time, which is pretty valuable to me.
  • Tell your client you don’t offer retouching like that. It is ok to say no – but be nice about it!

What Do You Do?

Have you had this request come up before? How did you handle it? Did it work well for you, or do you wish you had done it differently?

PS – In perfect timing, my friend Nino Batista has kicked off Private Retouch Training! I’ve heard nothing but amazing things from friends that have attended his Masterclass workshop around the country, and it is an amazing deal! He is now scheduling for Summer/Fall 2014. Private, live, one on one retouching training in Photoshop via Google+ or Skype, approximately 2 hours of one on one time dedicated to advancing your retouching skills. This is one of his most popular services, and scheduling is limited due to his work, events & travel schedule. So get with him ASAP to book ASAP! A few July, several August & September dates are currently available. Contact him directly to book at 832-458-8954 or via email at ninobatista@gmail.com — even if your style of photography is completely different, Nino is a retouching master!

Nino Batista Private Retouching Training

Photo Credit – Top of Post, Retouching Example: benoitchampagnephoto via Creative Commons license.

You Need to Run Away from Your Business

You need to run away from your business

Did you realize you need to run away from your business? That it could be one of the best things you ever did for it?

My blog post today for Inspire Photo Retreats is all about the things I learned when I did this myself last year.

Last year, I left home for what ended up being a 4 month, 19,000+ mile road trip. It wasn’t planned to be that long when I left, but as work found me along the way, I kept going. We left home originally so I could attend the World Domination Summit in Portland, visit family there, and then head to Seattle to see Mike’s brother and his family. After that, Mike was going to fly home, I’d drive back to Denver, park my car to fly to speak at BlogHer in Chicago, fly back to Denver to coach at the Team-X Fight Club, and then drive home.

When Fight Club ended was when it all began. I needed … something. I needed to get away. To unplug. To quiet the noise.

It is incredibly hard to admit that I completely neglected my business for those two weeks. As I reflect back on it, I realize it was one of the smartest moves I’ve made recently.

Go read the post there to learn more about the lessons I learned.

The biggest thing that came out of getting back to work? I went on to Calgary and met up with Stephanie and we created our Life + Business Coaching Program, Vivid & Brave.

It may be hard to admit, but I have no regrets.

When was the last time you took a vacation from your business? Have you ever completely cut yourself off and allowed yourself to recharge?

Self-Employed? You Can Be Fired for What You Say Publicly



Self-Employed? You can still be fired for what you say onlineMy first thought was, “I’m so glad I work for myself so I can say what I want.” I came home from holiday shopping and while my husband unwound with some X-Box time, I went to check in on Facebook and saw the first trickle of the response to the article GQ magazine.

That was my initial reaction as I read the Duck Dynasty story as it first broke late on Wednesday night. Thinking that just because you’re self-employed means you can’t be fired brings about a false sense of security.

You can still be fired – by your clients.

By the next morning, news was out that Phil was put on indefinite hiatus by A&E, and half the internet seemed to be in a uproar about his rights under Freedom of Speech, and the other half was either ambivalent or felt that A&E made the right move.

Personally? I’ve never seen the show, so I couldn’t speak on the issue. I could speak about the Freedom of Speech issue though — because Freedom of Speech does NOT mean freedom from consequence. It simply means that the government or the police can not come after you for what you said. If your employer or your client isn’t happy with it, they can choose not to work with you.

Then it happened again.

Just over 24 hours later, Justine Sacco made a rather crass post to Twitter, and then boarded a plane to Africa. The same continent she just slammed in her tweet. Probably smart to get out of London, after saying things about them too. By the time she landed after her wi-fi free flight 13 hours later, she too had been fired from her job. She was a trending hashtag on Twitter. People were sending her death threats.

I didn’t see anyone defending her right to Freedom of Speech though. Probably because what she said was pretty horrific.

It was fascinating to watch these two events go down in such a short span of time. The lesson I was reminded of is that the internet never forgets. You can delete a tweet, but you can’t control who has seen it or copied it already. What you say can and will live on. While many of us are self-employed, we are still employed – BY OUR CLIENTS.

“Type up a Facebook status update — and it can be radioactive forever. Don’t be fooled by your keyboard: the Internet doesn’t have a delete button. Screenshots can make your words have a half life of eternity. Social media is exactly that — social. It impacts you socially for as long as you are a member of society.

One tweet can be the last tick in the bomb that detonates your life.” — from Dear Kids: What You Need to Know About Duck Dynasty, Justine Sacco, and Christmas, the post that inspired me to write this post.

We might not make a late night joke on Twitter or Facebook and then find ourselves fired the next day. What you say might be seen by a potential client on social media, or a friend of a potential client. Or a friend of a friend. Doesn’t matter. It is seen by others, and it can hurt you. It can keep you from getting more clients.

Private is not private when it comes to the Internet.

Do not fall in to the trap of thinking that your Twitter stream or Facebook wall is set to private and only your closest friends see it. Or that you’re posting it in a private Facebook group, so your clients will never know. People can easily capture an image of the screen or copy/paste the text. You do not know who is in that group, who may be watching.

I see it constantly. People complaining about clients in the groups that I’m in. STOP. Your peers are judging you for it, and one of them could choose to leak it. I’ve had people who live in other cities ask me for recommendations of people to work with. If you’re constantly complaining in a private group about how much you hate your clients, how crazy they are, how they frustrate you, do you think I will recommend you? The answer to that is a loud & resounding NO.

You never know who sees what you are saying online.

Back when I was in high school, I passed notes in class with my friends. I wrote something in a note once about a friend who I was angry with at the time, and another friend showed it to her, causing quite a shitstorm for me. My mom said that if I didn’t want something to get back to someone, never write it down.

The same still applies these days. Only now? The internet has a permanent quality that note passing in 10th grade never had. Something can come back to haunt you, even years later. Think about what you write down online. What you say to other people. You are your brand at ALL times, and what you say matters to your clients, who are ultimately your employers. With social media what you say can spiral far out of your control. Just ask Justine Sacco about that this morning.

Justine Sacco Twitter Stream
Screen cap from my iPhone last night, before Justine Sacco’s Twitter Account was deleted.